Professor Jon Bannister

Professor of Criminology
Professor Jon Bannister

Responsibilities

Jon has a research interest in urban disorder. In particular, his work is concerned with: the conceptual and empirical realities of civility, respect and tolerance in the public realm; youth gangs and territoriality; perceptions of crime and antisocial behaviour; crime trends and their causation; and, the prevention and management of disorder (interventions and systems of governance). He also holds a growing interest in knowledge exchange / mobilisation and the civic academy.

 

Background

Academic and professional qualifications

Professorial Fellowship -- University of Glasgow

Previous Employment

University of Glasgow - up to March 2013

He also acts as a lecturer at the Scottish Police College.

Expertise

Jon has recently commenced work on the ESRC funded (£2.7m) Applied Quantitative Methods Network project, which seeks to explain the recent dramatic changes in crime across UK polities; the qualities of, and distinctions between, offender and victim profiles; the characteristics of criminal careers; and, the efficacy of criminal justice interventions.

Research Interests

Jon has a research interest in urban disorder. In particular, his work is concerned with: the conceptual and empirical realities of civility, respect and tolerance in the public realm; youth gangs and territoriality; perceptions of crime and antisocial behaviour; crime trends and their causation; and, the prevention and management of disorder (interventions and systems of governance). He also holds a growing interest in knowledge exchange / mobilisation and the civic academy.

Jon has recently commenced work on the ESRC funded (£2.7m) Applied Quantitative Methods Network project, which seeks to explain the recent dramatic changes in crime across UK polities; the qualities of, and distinctions between, offender and victim profiles; the characteristics of criminal careers; and, the efficacy of criminal justice interventions.

Academic collaborations

Jon is a managing editor of the journal of Urban Studies and established the Urban Studies Foundation (USF) as the charitable parent body of Urban Studies. The Foundation supports urban research in the UK and abroad, with an emphasis on capacity building.

Jon is a co-founder of the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR, 2006 -), which was underpinned by a £2.5m Scottish Funding Council award (co-applicant), subsequently augmented by £1 million policy-research contract from Scottish Government. SCCJR has expanded research capacity; supported international and national research funding partnerships; and directly informed Scottish Government law and order policy development.

Jon has undertaken numerous knowledge exchange activities beyond the academy. His research team helped design and launch the Safer Communities Scotland website (http://www.safercommunitiesscotland.org/). The website serves to share learning and information resources relevant to community safety practitioners. He also acts as a lecturer at the Scottish Police College.

Research Activity

Publications

Refereed journal articles

Bannister, J. and Kearns, A. (2013) The function and foundations of urban tolerance: encountering and engaging with difference in the city, Urban Studies, DOI: 10.1177/0042098013477705.

Bannister, J. and O’Sullivan, A. (2013) Knowledge mobilisation and the civic academy: the nature of evidence, the roles of narrative and the potential of contribution analysis, Contemporary Social Science, DOI: 10.1080/21582041.2012.751497.

Bannister, J. and O’Sullivan, A. (2013) Civility, community cohesion and antisocial behaviour: Policy and social harmony. Journal of Social Policy, 42 (1), 91-110. DOI:10.1017/500472794120000736.

Bannister, J., Pickering, J. and Kintrea, K. (2013) Young people and violent territorial conflict: exclusion culture and the search for identity, Journal of Youth Studies, 16 (4), 474-490. DOI:10.1080/13676261.2012.725835.

Bannister, J. and Kearns, A. (2013) Overcoming intolerance to young people's conduct: Implications from the unintended consequences of policy in the UK, Criminology and Criminal Justice, 13 (4), 380-397. DOI:10.1177/1748895812458296.

Pickering, J., Kintrea, K., and Bannister, J. (2012) Invisible walls and invisible youth: territoriality among young people in British cities, Urban Studies, 49 (5), 945-960.

Bannister, J., Croudace, R., Pickering, J., and Lightowler, C. (2011) Building safer communities: knowledge mobilisation and community safety in Scotland, Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 13 (4), 232-245.

Kintrea, K., Bannister, J., and Pickering, J. (2010) Territoriality and disadvantage among young people: an exploratory study of six British neighbourhoods, Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, 25 (4), 447-465.

Kearns, A., and Bannister, J. (2009) Conceptualising tolerance: paradoxes of tolerance and intolerance in contemporary Britain, Italian Journal of Sociology of Education, 2, 126-147.

Bannister, J., and Fraser, A. (2008) Youth gang identification: learning and social development in restricted geographies, The Scottish Journal of Criminal Justice Studies, 14, 96-114.

Other

Hardill, I., Bannister, J. and Martin, S. (2013) Dancing with new partners: Developing novel research methods to establish and monitor impacts of user engagement in times of austerity, Report on a series of agenda-setting workshops, National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM), Networks for Methodological Innovation, March.

Livingston, M., Kearns, A. and Bannister, J. (2012) Neighbourhood Structures and Crime in Glasgow, briefing paper 20, Glasgow: GoWell/GCPH. www.gowellonline.com

Kintrea, K., Bannister, J., and Pickering, J. (2011) ‘It's just an area- everybody represents it': exploring young people's territorial behaviour in British cities, in Goldson, B. Youth in Crisis? Gangs, territoriality and violence, London: Routledge, 55-71.

Bannister, J., Fyfe, N. and Henry, A. (2011) Building Safer Communities, Economic and Social Research Council, End of Award and Impact Reports.

Bannister, J., Pickering, J., Bachelor, S., Burman, M., McVie, S., and Kintrea, K. (2010) Troublesome Youth Groups, Gangs and Knife Carrying in Scotland, Edinburgh: Scottish Government.

Mackenzie, S., Bannister, J., Flint, J., Parr, S., Millie, A. and Fleetwood, J. (2010) The Drivers of Perceptions of Anti-social Behaviour, Research Report No. 34, London: Home Office.

Bannister, J., MacKenzie, S., and Norris, P. (2009) Public Space CCTV in Scotland: Results of a National Survey of Scotland’s Local Authorities, A report prepared on behalf of Scottish Government, Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research, Report No.2/09.

Bannister, J., and Kearns, A. (2009) Tolerance, Respect and Civility Amidst Changing Cities, in Millie, A. (ed) Securing Respect: behavioural expectation and anti-social behaviour in the UK, Bristol: Policy Press, 171-191.

Gilchrist, E., Bannister, J., Farrall, S. and Ditton, J. (2008) Women and the 'Fear of Crime': challenging the accepted stereotypes’, in Evans, K. and Jamieson, J. A Reader in Gender and Crime, Open University Press, 76-86.

Kintrea, K., Bannister, J., Pickering, J., Reid, M., and Suzuki, N. (2008) Young People and Territoriality in British Cities, York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

Publications

  • Bannister, J., and Hardill, I. (2014) Knowledge Mobilisation and the Social Sciences: Research impact and engagement London: Routledge View publication »
  • Livingston, M., Galster, G., Kearns, A. and Bannister, J. (2014) Criminal neighbourhoods: Does the density of prior offenders in an area encourage others to commit crime? Environment and Planning A, 46, 2469-2488.
  • Bannister, J. and O’Sullivan, A. (2014) Evidence, anti-social behaviour and the policy cycle, Evidence and Policy, 10 (1), 77-92.
  • Livingston, M., Kearns, A. and Bannister, J. (2014) Neighbourhood structures and crime: the influence of tenure mix and other structural factors upon crime rates, Housing Studies, 29 (1), 1-25.
  • Bannister, J., Bates, E. and Kearns, A. (2014) Local differences in the crime drop: Are there winners and losers?, AQMeN Research Briefing 3, November.

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